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Archaeological science and computing, Page 3

Bringing the Neolithic Figurines of Koutroulou Magoula Back to Life

Clay Neolithic figurines are some of the most enigmatic archaeological objects, which depict in a miniature form humans, animals, other anthropomorphic or zoomorphic beings, and often hybrid or indeterminate entities. Figurines have excited scholarly and public imagination, and have given rise to diverse interpretations. The assemblage from Koutroulou Magoula, a Middle Neolithic site – 5800-5300 BC – in central Greece (excavated under the co-direction of Prof. Continue reading →

En route for Easter Island and a piece of Google’s doodle

Photogrammetry image of the statue featured in the Google doodle from 15 January 2014 (James Miles, ACRG) A century ago today, the Mana, an auxiliary schooner captained by Scoresby Routledge, stewarded by his wife Katherine and crewed by a collection of English seamen, fishermen, scientists and the odd Royal Navy lieutenant, had just been hauled up onto a floating deck in Talcahuano on the Chilean coast. They were nearly a year into their voyage. Continue reading →

The Oxford Handbook of Light in Archaeology

Recently, I signed a contract with Oxford University Press for an interdisciplinary volume entitled The Oxford Handbook of Light in Archaeology. This book, which will be edited by myself and Graeme Earl, is the only book to date dedicated to the concept of light in archaeology, since existing work in this area is either specifically related to forms of illumination, to isolated case studies or to light in literature and iconography. Continue reading →

Night with Gertrude. And Victor.

Updated Dec 9th: Video added. Gertrude with high altar behind Gertrude is an old lady. About 600 years old. She is one of the wooden statues at the high altar in St. Nicholas’ Church, Tallinn. Gertrude is reviled to the public three times a year. Rest of the time she and other status are hidden behind the massive altar wings. Those altar wings are covered with medieval comic strip about life of St. Nicholas and St. Victor. Continue reading →

Symposium at Rochester: Contemporary Themes in 3D Archaeological Computing

I am going to be speaking on December 4th 2013 at a symposium on 3d digital archaeology. The symposium, organised by Renato Perucchi and Elizabeth Colantoni at the University of Rochester, will discuss state-of-the-art multidisciplinary issues bridging the humanities and the applied sciences related to 3D modeling, visualization, and analysis including engineering evaluations of complex archaeological structures and data. Continue reading →

ACRG member moves to University of York

Gareth digging at Basing House, Summer 2013. ACRG member, Gareth Beale, has been appointed as Research Fellow at the University of York. Gareth will be based at the Centre for Digital Heritage. In his post as Research Fellow, Gareth will manage and share the coordination of a new international collaboration in Digital Heritage between the Universities of York, Aarhus, Leiden and Uppsala. Continue reading →

Icons RTI case study

Icons: Production  techniques and examination methodology Icon or ikon from Greek eikĹŤn is a representation of a sacred or sanctified Christian personage used in religious worship in the Russian or Greek Orthodox Church. The production of icons has been described by the monk Dionisios ek Fourna in 1728-1733. Icons are typically painted on a wooden panel with the egg tempera painting technique, over a layer of gypsum and glue (preparation layer). Continue reading →