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Staff, Page 2

By Jupiter!

Professor of Music and Head of Keyboard Studies, David Owen Norris tells us about tonight's concert at Beaulieu. I've been preparing for our Jupiter Project concert in the spectacular Upper Drawing Room at Palace House, Beaulieu, at 6.30pm on Wednesday 4th October: sibbing the parts of Clementi’s ‘adaptation’ of Mozart’s Jupiter Symphony, for flute, violin, cello and piano. Continue reading →

Summer performances – on and off the air

Professor David Owen Norris describes his summer projects - a special post for all the students who think the staff are on holiday when term is over :) Pianos & Premieres The Geffrye Museum has very kindly decided to give us an 1812 Strecker grand pianoforte with divided pedal. This will fit very well with our other instruments with divided pedals – a Ganer Square of 1781, a Broadwood grand of 1828, and a Bechstein of 1902. Continue reading →

Southampton composers at the Ludomusicology 2017 Conference

Postgraduate  Music student Ben Jameson tells about a recent conference attended by Southampton composers. The Ludomusicology Research Group is an organisation comprised of academics from various universities, dedicated to the study of game music. Founded in 2011, their 6th annual conference took place this April at Bath Spa University, and had a specific focus on the theme of ‘performance’. Continue reading →

Sound Heritage down under

Jeanice Brooks reports on the latest Sound Heritage venture: I've just returned from a wonderful symposium at Elizabeth Bay House in Sydney, organised by Dr Matthew Stephens of Sydney Living Museums. Matthew is the research librarian of SLM's Caroline Simpson Library and Research Collection, and he has been the international member representing Australia at the study days held by the Sound Heritage network in the UK over the past two years. Continue reading →

PerformArt Research Project

Valeria de Lucca, Lecturer in Music, reports on an exciting new project she is involved in. A three-day conference at the École Française de Rome from 5 to 7 December 2016 kick-started a new project funded by the European Research Council: PERFORMART: “Practicing, Producing, and Protecting the Arts in Rome (1644-1740). Towards a Shared History of Performing Arts in Roman Family Archives. Continue reading →

The Loop Project – coming soon!

We are all looking forward to 3-5 February, when the Music Department will present a whole weekend of performances and workshops exploring musical loops. Leading jazz musicians Ivo Neame, Jasper Høiby and Jon Scott will join the HARTLEY Loop Orchestra to perform a major revision of Benjamin Oliver’s Loop Concerto, which was premiered by Neame and Kent County Youth Orchestra in 2013. Continue reading →

‘Joy and Freedom’ in Paris

Associate Professor in Composition Matthew Shlomowitz reports on a recent trip to Paris. Last week I attended a dance performance at the Théâtre National de Chaillot in Paris that featured my work, alongside music by Tom Zé and Ben Harper. The show was titled La Fête (de l'insignifiance) and performed by the Paulo Ribeiro Dance Company, based in Portugal. The three Paris dates followed performances in Lisbon, Viseu, Coimbra and Flor in Portugal, and Besançon in France. Continue reading →

Sound Heritage on the road

Recent months have been especially busy for the Sound Heritage project, not only with our November study day at Tatton Park, but also with a new venture - Sound Heritage Ireland. Sound Heritage Ireland Sound Heritage Ireland is a new initiative convened by Dr Karol Mullaney-Dignam, whose research delves into social, economic and political aspects of music and dance in Irish country houses. Continue reading →

Sound Heritage at the RNCM

Last month Southampton PhD student Catherine Garry joined the Sound Heritage network at Tatton Park (Cheshire), for a study day featuring music from the house's extensive library.  Sound Heritage joined forces with the Royal Northern College of Music to explore the music collected by Elizabeth Sykes, who married into the Egerton family of Tatton Park in the early 19th century. Continue reading →