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Blog, Page 39

Rome’s Lost Empire

A documentary called Rome’s Lost Empire featuring our work at Portus funded by the AHRC and the Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma (Ostia Antica) was broadcast on BBC One in the UK at 8:40 pm on Sunday 9th December 2012. You can watch it now on BBC iPlayer from within the UK. If you are interested in behind the scenes information on the computer graphics on the programme and how it benefits our research read the Reconstructing Portus – Rome’s Lost Empire post. Continue reading →

Agincourt on the BBC

Broadcast in September 2004, BBC Radio 4′s long-running series ‘In Our Time’, presented by Melvyn Bragg discussed the Agincourt with Anne Curry; Michael Jones, medieval historian and writer, and John Watts, Fellow and Tutor in Modern History at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. “Owre kynge went forth to Normandy, With grace and myyt of chivalry; The God for hym wrouyt marvelously, Wherefore Englonde may calle, and cry Deo gratias: Deo gratias redde pro victoria. Continue reading →

Digital Transformations 2012

The Digital Transformations Moot 2012 takes place on the 19th November in London and is a large scale day-long event for all with an interest in the new AHRC theme ‘Digital Transformations’.  The theme aims to support the potential of digital technologies for transforming research in the humanities and the arts. Throughout the day, the members of the sotonDH team will be showcasing our work in the Hack Space. Continue reading →

Funding for multidisciplinary field school at Portus

We have been awarded funding from a Student Centredness fund grant to create a unique field school at Portus that will provide the context for novel learning experiences to students from across the University, including an on-line infrastructure to build a community around a period of archaeological fieldwork in Italy. It will also benefit from a related SC project aimed at providing virtual access to the Portus fieldwork experience. Continue reading →

Photographing Portus

Working underground presents a unique photographic challenge: Here we can see myself and James Miles laser scanning a subterranean corridor in the Imperial Palace. The long exposures required to capture a dimly lit scene mean that light and movement take on the form of blurs and shadows. Photography has been extremely important to the Portus Project. Continue reading →

Laser Scanning at Portus

In the past week myself and Gareth Beale have spent time capturing the subterranean areas of  the Imperial Palace at Portus. We have been trialing the use of the Leica Scan Station C10 for archaeological documentation and the results so far appear very impressive. All archaeological remains are subject to constant deterioration, this is especially true of substantial architectural remains such as the Imperial Palace. Continue reading →