CMA on the Road

IKUWA 2016 conference marked a special event for Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology. Over twenty of us attended the event in Fremantle, at the Western Australia Maritime Museum, held for four days, November 28 till December 2nd, 2016. The conference began

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IKUWA 2016 conference marked a special event for Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology. Over twenty of us attended the event in Fremantle, at the Western Australia Maritime Museum, held for four days, November 28 till December 2nd, 2016. The conference began with a UNESCO roundtable on the first day. Regional underwater cultural heritage issues were brought to light, and general concerns were expressed. That was followed the next day by a provoking session chaired by Dr Lucy Blue from the University of Southampton and Dr Colin Breen from the University of Ulster. The session focused on maritime archaeology capacity building and training in developing countries. Ziad Morsy (PhD Candidate), Dr Lucy Semaan (Post-doctoral fellow) and Robert MacKintosh (PhD Candidate) from the CMA presented respectively on the state of art situation of Egypt, Lebanon, and the UNESCO convention.

Meanwhile CMA posters by Ziad Morsy, Katerina Velentza (PhD Candidate), Kiki Kuijjier (PhD Candidate), Dr Carmen Obied (CMA alumni) and Steven Lopez (CMA alumni) exemplified the wide range of research on topics such as sailing the Nile during the 19th-20th centuries, transport of sculpture during the Hellenistic and Roman periods, colonising Australia by the earliest known seafarers, and sensory navigation in the Roman Mediterranean.

CMA posters

IKUWA6 conference brought together the worldwide community of maritime and underwater archaeology in which the CMA disseminated high quality research. Here’s the list of paper presentations and titles:

  • Dr Clara Fuquen Gomez (CMA alumni): Logboats of Coquí: an ethnographic approach to maritime material culture.
  • Dr Rachel Bynoe (CMA alumni): The cold case of the Eccles Bonebeds: diver ground-truthing in the North Sea.
  • Dr Fraser Sturt (Associate Professor): Submerged landscapes: ‘Good to think’.
  • Charlotte Dixon (PhD candidate): Miniaturising boats: the value of models.
  • Crystal Safadi (PhD Candidate): A Maritime Space-Time of the Levantine Basin.
  • Robert MacKintosh (PhD Candidate): Capacity building and the 2001 UNESCO Convention: an Adriatic perspective.
  • Professor Jonathan Adams, Kroum Batchvarov, Kalin Dimitrov, Justin Dix, Helen Farr, Dragomir Garbov, Johann Rönnby, Dimitris Sakellariou, Fraser Sturt, Lyudmil Vagalinski: Deep water archaeology in the Black Sea.
  • Mitzy Antonieta Quinto Cortés (PhD Candidate), Professor Jonathan Adams & Mark Jones (The Mary Rose Trust, UK): Preservation in situ of UCH in estuarine contexts: the relationship between material remains and the environment.
  • Ziad Morsy (PhD Candidate) & Emad Khalil ( Alexandria University): After one hundred years, is it still ‘nascent’?
  • Dr Lucy Semaan (Post-Doctoral fellow): Maritime archaeology in Lebanon: state of the art, challenges, and future prospects.
  • Dr Lucy Blue (Senior Lecturer) & Colin Breen (University of Ulster): Capacity building and training in the global south: introductory paper.
  • Dr Lucy Blue (Senior Lecturer), Jeremy Green & *Tom Vosmer (*C/- Western Australian Museum, Australia): Maritime Archaeology Survey of Oman (MASO) 2015.

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Identities & Islam

On 19th-20th April the University of Southampton Faculty of Humanities hosted Identities & Islam: The First UK Early Career Symposium on Islamic Archaeology – an event created by myself and Sarah Inskip in the Department of Archaeology.

Prof Alan Walmsley delivering the keynote presentation at the symposium. Photo: Phil Riris

What is Islamic Archaeology?

The term Islamic Archaeology, though it is sometimes used to mean archaeological research relating to the religion of Islam itself (as opposed to the archaeology of Christianity, Buddhism, etc.), is more often a term for the archaeology of societies in which Islam is the dominant religion.

The field has gained prominence in recent years, though it has a long history of playing second fiddle to preceding ancient cultures. Early pioneers such as Ali Bahgat Bey, K. A. C. Creswell and Ernst Herzfeld attempted to bring the Islamic period heritage of countries such as Egypt and Iraq to a level of importance equal to that of more ancient civilisations. Yet not only has Islamic Archaeology remained more peripheral to the interests of governments and academia, but there many problems in the approaches of these early scholars.

Continue reading “Identities & Islam”

#CAAPerth Day Four

<Live blog> 11:38 Interesting to get statistics on usage in the field next season – can get at issues then of serendipitous discovery perhaps. Also discussion of potential impact (good and bad) on evolving archaeology on the site of accessing information before it has been in some way checked or otherwise curated. Also is the […]

<Live blog>

11:38

Interesting to get statistics on usage in the field next season – can get at issues then of serendipitous discovery perhaps. Also discussion of potential impact (good and bad) on evolving archaeology on the site of accessing information before it has been in some way checked or otherwise curated. Also is the immediacy of connection between the field and the spceialists. This relates to ongoing work on fieldwork ethnographies as part of the RCUK Patina Project. Also are there plans for linking in these data to publication.

11:35

11:30

Q&A: The advantage of paper is that you can see the changes. You can see all the edit history for all records.

11:28

After three seasons of paperless archaeology at Pompeii communiciation and data access between the people working in all roles at the site and beyond has markedly improved. These benefits far outweigh the issues. More info on Cincinnati blog.

11:27

More information relating to this work is available from the Paperless Archaeology blog.

11:25

Clear benefits in terms of transparency, data management, inventory control and awareness as a consequence of the use of ipad tablets.

11:19

Relevant papers from CAA2012: http://caaconference2012.sched.org/event/8ea5baae496798dde273f5b8deaa75e1?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no#?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no http://caaconference2012.sched.org/event/b054e5104b6d2e305b965791cc0770f9?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no#?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no http://caaconference2012.sched.org/event/9d1ac527a4d73a3e9aacafddf59fd26f?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no#?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no http://caaconference2012.sched.org/event/c4600f5bbd494e01f5fcc039dd469ce3?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no#?iframe=yes&w=990&sidebar=yes&bg=no 11:16

11:08

Greg is reading his notes on use of ipads at Pompeii from his ipad.

11:06

Now in Greg Tucker’s paper: Beyond Tablet Computers as a Tool for Data Collection: Three Seasons of Processing and Curating Digital Data in a Paperless World

10:45

3D PDFs, web models, full resolution obj files etc., all also with locational information in 3D and cartographically. 10:33 You can view thumbnails of multiple obejcts returned by a query or dragged onto the workspace. You can also move the virtual light source over the object interactively. Also zoomable and downloadable high resolution data.

10:31

System allows simple creation of 3D PDF from scan data for download. You can access all the source scripts for free: http://anthropologylabs.umn.edu/digital/webTech.html

10:27

Link to the Minnesota digital lab. Describing google doc as the basis for the content management system, and the use of WebGL and HTML5. The Digital Media library based on these data is onlineExample site on rock art scanning.

10:22

Now speaking Kristy Golubiewski-Davis: Engaging with 3D models beyond specialized software

10:20

Next steps for the Williamsburg Models: AR app, iOS Unity app and integration in their RevQUest alternate reality game series.

10:15

Lisa navigating the models live and providing the narration works really well. Reminded of Daniel Pletinckx’s RadioPast workshop presentation referring to the value of this in the context of V-must findings.

10:14

Next stage is linking exterior and interior models, and linking the models to the underlying data.

10:10

Modelled Williamsburg allows the representation of the town in particular periods. Lisa is now showing the Unity model in a live demo. (Also stumbled across this http://www.eduweb.com/portfolio-betwixt.html)

10:00

Next up Lisa Fischer: Exploring Williamsburg Virtually: Developing an Interactive Model of Williamsburg’s Revolutionary City Neighborhood in 1776

9:58

Q&A suggested that more specific analysis of the types of software and the data created in 3d modelling in archaeology would be beneficial.

9:56

More detail and less interoperability – limited practical implementations of standards despite acceptance of their relevance. For example, London Charter applications only cited in 5 or 6 publications surveyed. Networks of practice (whether naturally developing or funded) are increasingly important.

9:53

In terms of trends there is a focus around large EU funding schemes. There is fast adoption of new technologies (to be expected in this context) and increasing relevance of social media. In terms of presentation there are clear trends in showing research process vs. realistic impression, and in providing more immersive, lively representations.

9:51

Graph analysis of common authorship, and also institutions. Several clusters with strong linkages.

9:48

Bibliometric, graph analysis, qualitiative content analysis of 3d pubs: Authors: Italy top country + Computing top discipline. Archaeology of Italy is most studied in these papers.

9:30

9:26

9:14

9:05

 

8:57

 

 

8:45

 

8:35

#CAAPerth Day Two – afternoon sessions

I am in a few sessions this afternoon. First: Is there time for archaeology? Understanding time through modelling and representation Chair(s): Xavier Rodier, Lahouari Kaddouri Format: Long Paper Presentation Schedule: Tuesday 26th 13:30 – 15:00 Room: Seminar Room 2 Venue: University of Western Australia Club Second: E pluribus unum – Connecting People, Connecting Data Chair(s): […]

I am in a few sessions this afternoon.

First:

Is there time for archaeology? Understanding time through modelling and representation
Chair(s): Xavier Rodier, Lahouari Kaddouri

Format: Long Paper Presentation

Schedule: Tuesday 26th 13:30 – 15:00

Room: Seminar Room 2

Venue: University of Western Australia Club

Second:

E pluribus unum – Connecting People, Connecting Data

Chair(s): Guus Lange, Matthias Lang

Format: Long Paper Presentation

Schedule: Tuesday 26th 10:30 – 15:00

Room: Case Study Room

Venue: University of Western Australia Club

<live blog>

14:44

Guus discussing work at his institution on PCA applied to undertake automatic ceramic assemblage classifications.

14:42

 

14:40

Guus’ example of term variation and disambiguation reminded me of the @sotonDH SAMTLA talk from a few weeks ago. This discussed a tool that enabled exactly the form of multiple-term searching. Watch the SAMTLA seminar video here.

14:31

Guus Lange talking now: Beyond metadata; computing archaeological knowledge

14:29

Q&A: mentioned Sebastian Heath‘s nomisma project as an example.

14:23

Holly discussing a University of Southampton resource held on the ADS: Roman Amphora a Digital Resource. This resource has had 370,000 page views this year. Users stay for extended periods on many parts. It is by far the most used resource the ADS hold. There are twice as much as our entire Grey Literature Library (18,000 fieldwork reports).

In Holly’s work she has tried to map this dataset several times, due to the complexity of the process and the many possibilities. @leifuss suggested that it should be aligned to locational data for example. Reminded also of this tweet and the surrounding discussion #caauk:

 

Holly found that even stripping out skos:related it was too complicated. She decided it was  better to create a variety of classifications – need to take the literals (skos:altlabel) and create an RDF node.

Big questions:

  • If we start creating nodes for other people’s data this goes beyond our remit
  • Is it better to be useful or preserve the depositors intellectual process, reflected in the archive

Future work:

Use SKOS thesauri as a base. Using open annotation data model and ontology. Get involved more in SENESCHAL and ARIADNE.

14:15

Update from other session:

 

14:09

GeoNames, DBpedia, Library of Congress, NERC and Ordnance Survey are examples of Linked Data repositories used by the Archaeology Data Service.

14:04

Holly introducing Linked Data work at York. More info on this from the @ArchCRG seminar by Michael Charno available as a video here.

14:01

Moved room. Holly Wright about to start.

13:54

Q&A: Can you quantify uncertainty within this model? Yes but not implemented becuase of lack of agreement over how to ascribe uncertainty values (ironic!). I also asked about whether a provenance framework e.g. PROV had been mapped to this work. The answer is not yet but interest in it.

 

13:50

Benefits of employing an object-oriented data structure? CHARM provides the abstract reference model. Formal support: mark temporal features, allow for phases, capture ontic change, good to represent objectivised knowledge e.g. building materials. Representation of ubjective features allows for varying perspectives, captures epistemic change, represents interpretative knowledge.

13:45

We can use object slices – slices of the data object created over time and varying subjectivities, with each linked to the originator of this slice e.g. the name of a person who published an interpretation. Can then use diachronic composition to enable complex entities to be built from simpler ones e.g. Hall + Narthex = Church of Santa Olalla; subsequently elements added and these can also be represented. Because of the use of a conventional object representation we can reuse formal support for navigating object data structures.

13:40

Problem of hegemonic and static representations of the world in digital data structures. Using as an example a 19th C Galician church built on top of a crypt. Varying interpretations – Roman nymphaeum, Roman sanctuary to Cybele, Roman funerary place, Proto-Christian temple, Catholic temple, and deconsecrated monument. Alongside these interpretations lie a conventional phased timeline associated with the material remains and their transformation. How capture this complexity?

13:35

First up Expressing Temporal and Subjective Information about Archaeological Entities presented by C.Gonzalez-Perez

#CAAPerth Day Two – opening and first keynote

Day two at @CAAPerth started with an introduction to the conference by Gary Lock. He thanked in particular Arianna Traviglia who brought this week’s events to fruition. Thanks Arianna! Gary noted that c. 250 had made it to CAA this year – the 41st year CAA has run – with at least 100 from Australia, representing […]

Day two at @CAAPerth started with an introduction to the conference by Gary Lock. He thanked in particular Arianna Traviglia who brought this week’s events to fruition. Thanks Arianna! Gary noted that c. 250 had made it to CAA this year – the 41st year CAA has run – with at least 100 from Australia, representing another increase in CAA#s audience. Gary also noted the Nick Ryan bursary which is for current students. It will be voted on electronically and announced a month after the conference. Next up was the VC of UWA Paul Johnson. He provided an excellent, informed introduction and noted that this was the first CAA in the southern hemisphere. He described new courses running in archaeology at UWA, and then went on to discuss the rock art heritage of Australia in general and Western Australia in particular e.g. Western Desert regions, the Pilbara and the Kimberly. There are papers discussing technological applications relating to the latter two at CAA this week. He concluded by emphasising the significance of inter- and multi-disciplinary research practice. He works between social science and history and sees this research at the boundaries as amongst the most exciting – where assumptions are continuously challenged by people from a new perspective but equal intellectual commitment.

 

 

Next up Professor Len Collardfrom UWA giving us all a Welcome to Country from the Noongar people. He noted that it was ironic that the welcome to country is in a foreign language and said that he also wanted to welcome us in the language of the conference. He then discussed the relationship between the people of this country and archaeological practice there. He discussed the relationship between the disciplines such as indigenous studies and archaeology getting closer together and the positive impact this is happening. He mentioned that people talk about rock art a lot and so he gave Gary Lock a piece of rock art as a welcome to the country. He finished by playing his didgeridoo. It was an amazing sound, made even more so by the intakes of breath that the microphone picked up throughout. Best opening to a CAA I can remember, in all respects.

Next up was Ian Johnson, president of CAA Australia. He emphasised Len Collard’s welcome given to the ‘family’ of CAA. He also announced the official launch of CAA Australia taking place this evening. He then introduced the first keynote.

The keynote featured @ekansa Eric Kansa talking about http://opencontext.org/ and scholar communication.

He describes himself as an alt-ac – alternative academic, and noted the breadth and depth of activities in broad scale, evolving academic practice. Change has come and it is rapid, moving form a 19th C publication paradigm and moving to a much more data intensive paradigm, that also better reflects our current values. He noted that the web was itself born from the needs of scholarly communication, and also the long history of such motivations.

Eric then discussed ORBIS, and its invisibility in terms of academic credit. What do we consider to be ‘important’ and credit worthy academic contributions. Cue slide showing Austin Powers. Ne noted encourgaement to publish in the journal of evil (or was that medieval?) studies by Dr Evil :-) Next up “My Precious Data” and a slide of Gollem from Lord of the Rings. Here Eric discussed pioneering work of ADS in terms of looking after research data in the long term. Next a segue from Lord of the Rings to Ian Hodder and reading the past – the emphasis on scholarship building on rereading. Conventional scholarship does not well support such rereading, and in particular the separation between the data and the synthesis. We need theoretical understanding of value of data to be much more embedded in archaeological training. Such sharing and publciaiton of data inevitably leads on to thoughts of intellectual property. Eric discussed NAGRPA and (missing acronym) project exploring intellectual property and indigenous people’s rights. Eric then discussed Elsevier and the sense in which large scale publishing centralises, and consolidates scholarly practice – including in archaeology. And then wikipedia going dark against SOPA. Here I was reminded of the amazing seminar by @generalising last week.

Eric noted that libraries are in a sense ‘renting’ scholarly knowledge as a consequence of centralised publication practice. Then he discussed Aaron Swartz and the JSTOR case, and pay walls in general. Reminded of ongoing twitter and blog discussions mediated by @TarenSK If you do not have a university affiliation what do you do? You borrow a friend’s login or are sent a paper by email. But these are impossible legally in many cases. They also stifle scholarship both within and beyond the academy. What are the equity, legal and preservation issues of commodification of the past? Universities largely cannot afford ot pay for scholarly communications under the current model – he supported this with reference to Berkeley demonstrations last year. Even Harvard university noted they could not afford escalating scholarly communications costs. On a positive note he stressed the growth of alternative modes of scholary communications. He also talked about the work of Bethany Nowviskie and alt-ac. He discussed open data as an example of part fo this alternative academic revolution.

Eric then mentioned the Finch report and also his paper in Mark Lake’s World Archaeology special addition on Open Access and Archaeology. (Note: interesting twitter discussion around the irony of this being in a closed journal – mentioned also by Eric in the keynote- during #caauk2012 hosted by @lparchaeology .) He also noted how the USA is also now committing to open access to publically funded research data, and projects supporting this. (Note: our own @JISCDataPool project at University of Southampton has some relevance to this). He concluded by showing examples from open context such as Kenan Tepe, work on data citation, and then a round up showing what is next. Work with the Encyclopedia of Life including data from Catalhoyuk from 34 zooarchaeologists. More work is needed in modellign research methods in ways that are better than spreadsheets, and ways that support synthetic data research. If we elevate data to a first class citizen it is motivation for better tools. Hence need for FAIMS and Heurist. A fabulous start to @CAA2013Perth #caaperth

Related tweets via #caaperth:

 

 

#CAAPerth – ACRG involvement

Members of the ACRG are out in force at this year’s Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) conference at the University of Western Australia, Perth. Today there were workshops on complex systems simulation and reflectance transformation imaging organised by Tom Brughmans and Iza Romanowska, and by James Miles and Hembo Pagi. All related posts […]

Members of the ACRG are out in force at this year’s Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) conference at the University of Western Australia, Perth. Today there were workshops on complex systems simulation and reflectance transformation imaging organised by Tom Brughmans and Iza Romanowska, and by James Miles and Hembo Pagi.

All related posts from CAAPerth are available via the CAAPerth tag

Tomorrow Eleonora Gandolfi and Hembo have a paper on our multi-method imaging fieldwork on Kimberley rock art with Martin Porr from UWA: “Images of Images: Applying Digital Recording Technology in the Management and Visualisation of Kimberley Rock-Art”.

On Wednesday James Miles will give a paper on “the Parnassus Project: Archaeology and Engineering collaboration for 3D data collection and analysis”. James will also be giving a presentation on “Photogrammetry and RTI survey Hoa Hakananai’a Easter Island Statue”. Tom Brughmans will be presenting a paper on “When exploratory network analysis becomes confirmatory: exploring urban connectivity in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain”. Iza Romanowska is presenting a paper on “Finding resource in a desert: an agent based model of hunter gatherer foraging”. Both Tom and Iza are chairing the session on Complex systems simulation in archaeology.

The CAAPerth programme is available online.

If you want to follow the conference and contribute on Twitter use #CAAPerth and @CAA2013Perth. You can follow our tweets as usual via @ArchCRG.

All related posts from CAAPerth are available via the CAAPerth tag

Forthcoming international conference Creativity: An Exploration Through the Bronze Age and Contemporary Responses to the Bronze Age

Members of the HERA-funded project Creativity and Craft Production in Middle and Late Bronze Age Europe (CinBA) (www.cinba.net) co-ordinated by myself are getting ready for the forthcoming international conference Creativity: An Exploration Through the Bronze Age and Contemporary Responses to the Bronze Age to be held on 10th-11th April 2013 at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge, UK. There is a fantastic line up of speakers drawn from all across Europe (www.cinba.net/conference). To coincide with the conference a new exhibition of contemporary craft will be opening at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge. The exhibition Creativity In The Bronze Age – A Response.
Work by Mary Butcher, Susan Kinley, Helen Marton, Syann van Niftrik, Julian Stair, Sheila Teague and Gary Wright showcases the work of some of the best-known contemporary British artists/designers who have been working with CinBA since May 2012.

The conference and exhibition promise to be very exciting events. Registration for the conference is open until 3rd April (£58 students; £68 full registration) so there is still time to book a place if you would like to come along. Hope to see you there!