An Ocean without History? CMA and SMMI Annual Lecture 24th March 17.45

This year the CMA turns 20, and as such we thought it a good time to take stock and think about what we do well and what we could improve on.  Out of this discussion came the desire to shine

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This year the CMA turns 20, and as such we thought it a good time to take stock and think about what we do well and what we could improve on.  Out of this discussion came the desire to shine a brighter light on the research being conducted on maritime heritage (both within the  CMA and beyond) and to offer a space within which significant developments can be discussed.  As such we agreed that we would begin an annual lecture series, singling out a key issue per year and acting as a focus for our discussions.  At the same time, it became apparent that there was considerable shared interests between research conducted within the CMA and that represented more broadly within the Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute (SMMI).  As such, we’ve teamed together to help attract a more diverse audience with the hope of seeing discussion develop in new and interesting ways.

We are very pleased to announce that the inaugural annual lecture will be given by Dr Ulrike Guérin, UNESCO Secretariat of the 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage on Friday 24th March at 17.45 in lecture theatre A of the Avenue Campus, University of Southampton. Dr Guérin’s talk is entitled:
‘An ocean without history? Bringing the importance of the ocean’s history and underwater cultural heritage to the attention of the UN and of governments.’
At a time when the UK government is ever more closely aligning itself with the UNESCO 2001 convention, with formal adoption becoming a clear possibility, this talk represents a chance to hear about the value and importance of our shared cultural heritage and how it can be protected. This a public talk open to all, and we very much hope to see a diverse range of people there.  

To sign up for the event (tickets are free) follow this link.  

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CMA on the Road

IKUWA 2016 conference marked a special event for Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology. Over twenty of us attended the event in Fremantle, at the Western Australia Maritime Museum, held for four days, November 28 till December 2nd, 2016. The conference began

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IKUWA 2016 conference marked a special event for Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology. Over twenty of us attended the event in Fremantle, at the Western Australia Maritime Museum, held for four days, November 28 till December 2nd, 2016. The conference began with a UNESCO roundtable on the first day. Regional underwater cultural heritage issues were brought to light, and general concerns were expressed. That was followed the next day by a provoking session chaired by Dr Lucy Blue from the University of Southampton and Dr Colin Breen from the University of Ulster. The session focused on maritime archaeology capacity building and training in developing countries. Ziad Morsy (PhD Candidate), Dr Lucy Semaan (Post-doctoral fellow) and Robert MacKintosh (PhD Candidate) from the CMA presented respectively on the state of art situation of Egypt, Lebanon, and the UNESCO convention.

Meanwhile CMA posters by Ziad Morsy, Katerina Velentza (PhD Candidate), Kiki Kuijjier (PhD Candidate), Dr Carmen Obied (CMA alumni) and Steven Lopez (CMA alumni) exemplified the wide range of research on topics such as sailing the Nile during the 19th-20th centuries, transport of sculpture during the Hellenistic and Roman periods, colonising Australia by the earliest known seafarers, and sensory navigation in the Roman Mediterranean.

CMA posters

IKUWA6 conference brought together the worldwide community of maritime and underwater archaeology in which the CMA disseminated high quality research. Here’s the list of paper presentations and titles:

  • Dr Clara Fuquen Gomez (CMA alumni): Logboats of Coquí: an ethnographic approach to maritime material culture.
  • Dr Rachel Bynoe (CMA alumni): The cold case of the Eccles Bonebeds: diver ground-truthing in the North Sea.
  • Dr Fraser Sturt (Associate Professor): Submerged landscapes: ‘Good to think’.
  • Charlotte Dixon (PhD candidate): Miniaturising boats: the value of models.
  • Crystal Safadi (PhD Candidate): A Maritime Space-Time of the Levantine Basin.
  • Robert MacKintosh (PhD Candidate): Capacity building and the 2001 UNESCO Convention: an Adriatic perspective.
  • Professor Jonathan Adams, Kroum Batchvarov, Kalin Dimitrov, Justin Dix, Helen Farr, Dragomir Garbov, Johann Rönnby, Dimitris Sakellariou, Fraser Sturt, Lyudmil Vagalinski: Deep water archaeology in the Black Sea.
  • Mitzy Antonieta Quinto Cortés (PhD Candidate), Professor Jonathan Adams & Mark Jones (The Mary Rose Trust, UK): Preservation in situ of UCH in estuarine contexts: the relationship between material remains and the environment.
  • Ziad Morsy (PhD Candidate) & Emad Khalil ( Alexandria University): After one hundred years, is it still ‘nascent’?
  • Dr Lucy Semaan (Post-Doctoral fellow): Maritime archaeology in Lebanon: state of the art, challenges, and future prospects.
  • Dr Lucy Blue (Senior Lecturer) & Colin Breen (University of Ulster): Capacity building and training in the global south: introductory paper.
  • Dr Lucy Blue (Senior Lecturer), Jeremy Green & *Tom Vosmer (*C/- Western Australian Museum, Australia): Maritime Archaeology Survey of Oman (MASO) 2015.

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Something Old, Something New

The end of September and the start of October are one of the busiest times of the year within the CMA. In one instance our existing cohort of MA/MSc students are in the final stages of finishing and submitting their

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The end of September and the start of October are one of the busiest times of the year within the CMA. In one instance our existing cohort of MA/MSc students are in the final stages of finishing and submitting their dissertations – very much the culmination of their year of study. Staff are then busy marking and enjoying reflecting on the research and fieldwork that has gone into these very personal projects.

This year my own tutees have covered subjects ranging from sculptures found on shipwrecks in the Mediterranean, Mayan navigation, 20th century Cuban migration watercraft, the maritime element of Napoleon’s siege of Acre, and the archaeology of recreational watercraft. Extending a survey of dissertation topics across my colleagues would reveal an equally wide range of topics, periods, places and themes. Yet, this is not an unusual set of dissertation subjects, it is simply one that reflects the inherent diversity of approach that maritime archaeology occupies in the 21st century.

The reverse of this process then begins in the last week of September with the induction of our incoming cohort of MA/MSc students. This is always one of the most exciting parts of the year as we begin to meet and get to know a new group of maritime archaeologists from around the world. The 2016/17 group come from as far afield as the USA, Greece and China (and of course the UK), illustrating the great geographical spread of students that has been a hallmark of the CMA since it was founded.

At the same time, we welcome new doctoral researchers to the CMA. This year they include cross-faculty PhD projects in collaboration with engineering (ship science) and law, funded through the University’s ‘Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute (SMMI)’, as well as a project funded by the Honor Frost Foundation (HFF). All of these again serve to underline the great variety of areas of study for maritime archaeology. In many cases we are welcoming back alumni of previous MA/MSc cohorts, who are returning to Southampton having cut their teeth in the wider world of maritime archaeology.

So at a time of year when we are looking backwards with nostalgia at what has been another excellent MA/MSc cycle, we are also looking forward to the potential of the next year. We are able to send one group of maritime archaeologists to begin the next stage of their careers while welcoming in their successors and being able to plan their teaching, practical activities, and fieldwork for the next year – we’ll probably leave it a few months before asking them for a dissertation topic!

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Funded PhD: Mapping potential wreck sites with seafloor data – scientific, social and legal considerations

Funded PhD: Mapping potential wreck sites with seafloor data – scientific, social and legal considerations

We are very happy to announce a  fully funded PhD studentship for UK/EU students as part of the Marine and Maritime Futures Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholarship scheme at the University of Southampton.   If you have an excellent academic track record, are looking for a stimulating and challenging transdisciplinary project in a world class research environment please read on for further …

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Funded PhD: Mapping potential wreck sites with seafloor data – scientific, social and legal considerations

We are very happy to announce a  fully funded PhD studentship for UK/EU students as part of the Marine and Maritime Futures Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholarship scheme at the University of Southampton.   If you have an excellent academic track record, are looking for a stimulating and challenging transdisciplinary project in a world class research environment please read on for further details on how to apply …

Project Title:  Mapping potential wreck sites with seafloor data – scientific, social and legal considerations

SupervisorsDr Fraser Sturt, Dr Justin Dix and Prof Michael Tsimplis

Rationale:

Thousands of potentially polluting WWII shipwrecks litter the ocean floor. The pollutants carried on board may include oil, ammunition or other toxic materials. Leakage of pollutants from such wrecks may take place continuously or catastrophically, and the risk of such an event increases with time. The location of several of these wrecks is known and monitored by national administrations, but by far the majority sank without exact information on their location. The UK Ministry of Defence is presently undertaking a project trying to identify the location of such WW II wrecks, on the basis of historic information. In addition, hindcasts of oceanic circulation and storm surges extending before WWII can be used to enhance our understanding of the nature of the wrecking. Finally, there are now multiple publically available (UKHO, CCO, MCA) and commercial sources of swath bathymetry from the UK shelf, against which this archive derived wreck record can be compared. In many cases the decimetre resolution of the swath data will also facilitate full mapping of the identified sites.

This PhD will combine historical records with the prevailing weather and oceanographic conditions at the time of sinking in order to define areas where the wrecks may be. These zones will be cross- referenced against the extant swath bathymetry targets to facilitate an assessment of the environmental risk present in the various areas of the UK Continental Shelf. Key to this project is the co-consideration of legal responsibilities for identifying and locating such wrecks and ensure they are not polluting the seas. Issues to explore include: Where the wrecks were at the time of sinking beyond jurisdiction of the state but now rest within the UK shelf or EEZ does responsibility rest with the UK; Do the flag state of ships have responsibility under international law?

Methodology:

The student will undertake a wide range of activities, to include assessment of the historic record. These data sources will be cross- referenced with the HER and NMR records from Historic England and the UKHO wreck record as well as the extensive grey literature that exists. Key events will be cross-referenced against firstly observed and modelled meteorological and oceanographic data to supplement the written records of wrecking. GIS based spatial analysis will be fundamental to the identification of targets areas for analysis of the in situ data. Finally, digital analysis of swath bathymetry data (and any other geological data available) from target zones will be undertaken to identify the location, state of the wreck and local sedimentary environment. Finally, the legal implications of the spread of sites will be considered with respect to both national and international law.

Training:

The project will entail a transdisciplinary approach which will require a good command of legal knowledge and skills as well as a contemporary real-world focus in marine and social sciences and inter disciplinary awareness for tackling the challenges of MSP framework.

The student will benefit from PGT and PGR taught modules in all three aspects of this transdisciplinary project. It will be essential in the first year that the student undertakes modules in high resolution marine geophysics, marine geoarchaeology, maritime law and maritime archaeology. In addition, to these taught modules there will be extensive opportunities for students to expand their multi-disciplinary outlook through interactions with a wide network of academic, research and industrial/government / policy such as those offered by the Centre of Maritime Archaeology, the Geology & Geophysics Research Group and the broader LTDS cohort. The researcher will attend lectures, symposia, seminar programs and conferences so as to be aware of the latest challenges relevant to the project.

Background reading:

1. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administation. 2013. Risk Assessment for Potentially Polluting Wrecks in U.S. Waters. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administation, Silver Spring, MD. 127 pp

2. Astley, A., Dix, J.K., Thompson, C.E.L. and Sturt, F. 2014. A seventeen year, near-annual, bathymetric time-series of a marine structure (SS Richard Montgomery). In, Cheng, L., Draper, S. and An, H.(eds.) Scour and Erosion: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Scour and Erosion. International Conference on Scour and Erosion, Taylor & Francis, 715-724.

How to apply:

To apply for this PhD candidates should first contact Dr Fraser Sturt to discuss the project.  Following this candidates should complete the online form found here: selecting the options for Faculty of Humanities, Doctor of Philosophy, Mphil/PhD Archaeology (Full Time).

Deadline for applications:  5th February 2016

Interview Date:  2nd March 2016

For further information contact: Dr Fraser Sturt, Dr Justin Dix and Prof Michael Tsimplis

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Winchelsea Medieval Port Project

New project at the ancient port of Winchelsea, East Sussex, to include geotechnical survey and an RTI survey of the Ship Graffiti in St. Thomas Church and the cellar underneath Blackfriars Barn. Find our more at the Medieval Ports, Ships and Sailors conference in Winchelsea on the 26th of April 2015. For more information, and […]

New project at the ancient port of Winchelsea, East Sussex, to include geotechnical survey and an RTI survey of the Ship Graffiti in St. Thomas Church and the cellar underneath Blackfriars Barn.

Find our more at the Medieval Ports, Ships and Sailors conference in Winchelsea on the 26th of April 2015.

For more information, and to register, please email thomas.dhoop@soton.ac.uk

Funded PhD Studentship

Applications are invited for a three-year PhD studentship in the Faculty of Humanities in collaboration with the Faculty of Natural and Environmental Science at the University of Southampton. This studentship is funded through an SMMI Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholarship Award, to start October 2015. The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Dr Helen […]

Applications are invited for a three-year PhD studentship in the Faculty of Humanities in collaboration with the Faculty of Natural and Environmental Science at the University of Southampton. This studentship is funded through an SMMI Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholarship Award, to start October 2015. The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Dr Helen Farr (Archaeology), Prof Robert Marsh (Ocean and Earth Science) and Dr Ivan Haigh (Ocean and Earth Science).

For more information, and to apply, please follow this link:

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AKS837/phd-studentship-in-prehistoric-archaeology-and-oceanography-exploitation-of-prevailing-winds-and-currents-by-the-earliest-known-seafarers-reaching-and-colonizing-australasia-c50000-years-ago

Medieval Seafaring video up for BUFVC award.

Our MOOC (free online maritime archaeology course) film maker, Joe Brett, has been nominated for the British Universities Film and Video Council Learning on Screen Awards for the Courseware and Curriculum In-House Production section for ‘Medieval Seafaring’. The short video on ‘Medieval seafaring and shipbuilding‘ presented by Prof Jon Adams and starring some of our recent Masters […]

Our MOOC (free online maritime archaeology course) film maker, Joe Brett, has been nominated for the British Universities Film and Video Council Learning on Screen Awards for the Courseware and Curriculum In-House Production section for ‘Medieval Seafaring’.

The short video on ‘Medieval seafaring and shipbuilding‘ presented by Prof Jon Adams and starring some of our recent Masters graduates wielding adzes and axes was shot at Bucklers Hard, Beaulieau last spring.

brett nomination

Adriatic Without Borders

If you happen to be in Italy, why not pop along to the exhibition currently running at Castello di Udine?  The exhibition, Adriatico Senza Confini, showcases cultural contact around the Adriatic Sea between 6000-4000 BC and  includes work by Helen Farr on navigation and seafaring. It will be running until the 22 February 2015, see exhibition page above, or take a look at […]

If you happen to be in Italy, why not pop along to the exhibition currently running at Castello di Udine?  The exhibition, Adriatico Senza Confini, showcases cultural contact around the Adriatic Sea between 6000-4000 BC and  includes work by Helen Farr on navigation and seafaring.

It will be running until the 22 February 2015, see exhibition page above, or take a look at their facebook page.

 

Adriatico senza confini, Udine, Italy

Adriatico senza confini, Udine, Italy

 

 

The Sea and Me: Public Event 22nd Nov

Saturday 22nd November 10am – 5pm Free This event will bring together researchers, local cultural institutions, and the wider public for a series of talks, workshops, and hands-on activities around the theme of The Sea. We’ll be considering everything from pirates to shipwrecks to sound and the sea. As a port city, Southampton has a long history […]

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Saturday 22nd November

10am – 5pm

Free

This event will bring together researchers, local cultural institutions, and the wider public for a series of talks, workshops, and hands-on activities around the theme of The Sea. We’ll be considering everything from pirates to shipwrecks to sound and the sea.

As a port city, Southampton has a long history of interaction with the sea and the industries surrounding it. This event will be an opportunity for the public to learn about and engage with innovative research on the sea across space and time.

The event is free and the Avenue Campus café will be open for visitors to purchase light refreshments.

In addition to the core talks, there will be some children’s activities from 12-3pm and an interactive exhibition. There will be a maritime archaeology ‘meet the experts’ drop-in room through the afternoon and several CMA members will be giving ‘core talks’ (including Julian Whitewright discussing ‘Shipwrecks of the Solent’, Fraser Sturt talking on ‘Living with Environmental Change’ and Jesse Ransley ‘Building backwater boats: mud, sewing and other stories’)

SeaCity Museum in Southampton will also be hosting some ‘Sea and Me’ activities as part of the day (entry fee to the museum applies).

There’s more info and the full programme for the day here or you can find out more from The Sea and Me team on twitter @theseaandme2014.

This event is part of the Being Human Festival, led by the School of Advanced Studies and supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the British Academy.

To book your place, please go to: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-sea-and-me-tickets-13023647079